Includes sea level rise; extreme weather; changes to ecosystems, plants and animals; melting ice and permafrost; ocean wamring; impacts to water resources, agriculture, public health and national security

In the summer of 2007, as oyster growers and hatchery managers in Washington state were experiencing yet another failed oyster harvest, Dr. Richard Feely set off on a research cruise to find out if the seawater itself was the culprit…

Climate scientists discuss what they know about global climate change today, and how they know it.

Carbon dioxide is everywhere: in the air, rising from cracks in the ocean floor, and in your soda can. Now it's showing up in the news! Find out why carbon dioxide is such a hot topic, and why it's going to be around for a long, long time.

Richard Feely discusses new findings about how increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic, and how that will affect ocean ecosystems and the marine animals that inhabit them.
 

Richard Feely discusses new findings about how increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic, and how that will affect ocean ecosystems and the marine animals that inhabit them.
 

This Webinar examines how the record-setting 2012 drought changed people's perceptions and attitudes on climate change.

State Adaptation Progress Tracker

Georgetown Climate Center's new online tool tracks what steps each state has made towards implementing climate change preparedness plans. Now, anyone will be able to quickly determine how much progress their state is making and decision-makers will be able to learn from innovative examples of actions other states are taking.

Lake Level Viewer: United States Great Lakes

This tool helps users visualize lake level changes that range from six feet above to six feet below historical long-term average water levels in the Great Lakes, along with potential shoreline and coastal impacts.

The University of Maryland is hosting Mpact Week to showcase reseach on the broad theme of disaster resilience.

This Webinar outlines research examining six high-impact weather events in Alaska, from 1974 to 2012.

Speakers: Lauren Zuromski, Hollings Scholar; Rick Thoman, National Weather Service; & John Walsh, ACCAP

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