Climate Impacts

It's the time of year for potentially toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie. But the stage for most blooms is set in spring.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

  • In the summer of 2007, as oyster growers and hatchery managers in Washington state were experiencing yet another failed oyster harvest, Dr. Richard Feely set off on a research cruise to find out if the seawater itself was the culprit…

  • For years, people have been pointing to El Niño as the culprit behind floods, droughts, famines, economic failures, and record-breaking global heat. Can a single climate phenomenon really cause all these events? Is the world just a step away from disaster when El Niño conditions develop?

  • Flooding in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    In NOAA's version of CSI, Marty Hoerling leads a group of climate and weather researchers who investigate killer climate patterns—heat waves, tornadoes, and floods—to figure out what may have triggered them.

  • “If the sea level goes up two or three feet along the coast of Maine in this century, that’s a very significant change.”
     

  • “The fact is scientists really can’t predict at this time what the impacts will be on any particular species.”

     

  • Rhode Island's coasts are already feeling the impacts of rising seas. The Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council and Rhode Island Sea Grant are working with the legislature to explicitly address sea level rise and climate change in the state's building code.

  • In May and June each year, speculation about the coming of the monsoon fills newspapers and conversations across India. Everyone is concerned about if, when, and how much rain will arrive. But none have more at stake than India’s over 100 million farming households.