August 4, 2020

Join three heat experts to talk about how we map, monitor, and lessen the impacts of urban heat islands.

Satellite image of Gulf of Mexico with bar graph of dead zone area as an overlay
July 16, 2020

NOAA scientists forecast that the Gulf dead zone would measure roughly 6,700 square miles—bigger than the long-term average recorded since 1985, but lower than the record-high extent observed in 2017.

Studying soot in snow
February 3, 2020

No. By a large majority, climate scientists agree that average global temperature today is warmer than in pre-industrial times, and that human activity is the primary contributing factor.

Lightning-sparked wildfire
January 23, 2014

Yes, there are, but the only new process on Earth that has been identified that can account for the significant tipping of Earth's carbon balance is human activity, including deforestation, biomass burning, cement production, and—especially—fossil-fuel emissions.

Aerosols along the Himalaya
January 23, 2014

Yes, human activities exert a cooling influence on Earth in several ways. Overall, this cooling influence is smaller than the warming influence of the heat-trapping gases humans put into the air.

Intermountain Power Plant
January 23, 2014

Yes, human activities have increased the abundance of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere, which a large majority of climate scientists agree is the main reason for the 1.5°F (0.85°C) rise in average global temperature since 1880.

October 17, 2019

If you missed our August 29 tweet chat, here's the transcript. Read what the fire and smoke experts had to say about the FIREX-AQ field campaign and its mission to study what's in the smoke from wildfires and agricultural burning. 

December 28, 2016
Trees within a city can help reduce urban heat, control stormwater, and provide habitat to local wildlife. As climate conditions change, a Chicago group is working to enhance the reilience of the city's urban forest.
July 16, 2015

Globally, carbon emissions from fires were near the long-term average in 2014, but North America's emissions were 70% higher than average.

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