February 8, 2011

Deep snow that fell across the Great Plains and the Northeast in late January and early February is the latest installment in the second very wintry winter in a row for the eastern U.S.

March 26, 2010

NOAA's Climate Scene Investigators analyzed why the mid-Atlantic region had record-setting snowstorms this winter. The team looked for but found no human "fingerprints" on the severe weather. Instead, they fingered two naturally occurring climate patterns as co-conspirators in the case.

September 1, 2009

The Pacific-North American teleconnection pattern influences regional weather by affecting the strength and location of the East Asian jet stream, and subsequently, the weather it delivers to North America.

August 30, 2009

Over the span of days or weeks, the strength of surface air pressure over the North Atlantic seesaws between Iceland and the Azores Islands. The shifting pressure reflects changes in atmospheric circulation that have a big impact on mid-latitude weather in the U.S. and Europe. 

August 30, 2009

The Arctic Oscillation (AO) refers to an atmospheric circulation pattern over the mid-to-high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The most obvious reflection of the phase of this oscillation is the north-to-south location of the storm-steering, mid-latitude jet stream.

March 25, 2021

Spring means only one thing at the ENSO Blog: it's time to verify the Winter Outlook! So how did things turn out? Read on to find out. 

January 28, 2021

A rapidly warming stratosphere and swirling polar vortexes, oh my! What is going on so far this winter? Three stratosphere experts help us sort it out.  

September 24, 2020

 Guest blogger Marybeth Arcodia explains her latest research into how the Madden-Julian Oscillation and ENSO sometimes enhance each other's influence on U.S. precipitation and other times cancel each other out.

March 26, 2020

How did the 2019-20 Winter Outlook do? Pretty darn good if you ask us! Learn just how good in our yearly verification post.

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