June 30, 2020

Transcript available! On Wednesday, February 5, climate expert Dr. Gijs de Boer answered questions in a Climate.gov tweet chat about the ATOMIC cloud-science mission in Barbados. Read the transcript. 

Graph of sunspot numbers from 1960-2018
January 23, 2014

Observations of sunspots and other indicators of solar activity indicate no changes that could have caused global warming over the past half century. 

Western Greenland on August 1, 2019
August 14, 2019

The July 2019 heatwave exited Europe aimed in an unusual direction. It headed northwest and began melting the Greenland Ice Sheet.

December 7, 2017

Mount Agung in Indonesia erupted for the first time since 1963 causing widespread evacuations on the island of Bali. But is it a climate event? 

February 17, 2015

In addition to its primary mission of observing space weather, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite is carrying two instruments that are important to climate science: the NISTAR radiometer and the EPIC camera. 

December 6, 2012

It may seem remote from our everyday lives, but the Arctic exerts a powerful influence on the rest of the planet. From rising sea level, to U.S. and European weather, to bird migrations, NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco describes how Arctic climate change can influence the rest of the planet.

December 5, 2012

NOAA released the 2012 installment of the annual Arctic Report Card on December 5, 2012, as part of the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting. This image collection is a gallery of highlights based on the report's major themes. It was developed by the NOAA Climate.gov team in cooperation with Arctic Report Card authors and other Arctic experts.

December 5, 2012

The summer of 2012 brought Greenland far more extensive melt than anything observed in the satellite record: in July 2012, surface melt extended over nearly the entire ice sheet. The standardized melt index was nearly double the previous record.

October 12, 2012

Arctic sea ice extent set a new record low at the end of the summer melt season on September 16, 2012. But extent is not the only quality of the ice that is changing. Wind and ocean circulation patterns are conspiring with a warmer climate to reduce the amount of year-round (multi-year) ice, transforming the remaining ice into a younger, thinner version of its old self.

August 27, 2012

Arctic sea ice extent fell to 1.58 million square miles on August 26, 2012. This was 27,000 square miles smaller than the previous record low of 1.61 million square miles set in 2007.

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